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XenServer High-Availability Alternative HA-Lizard

XenServer High-Availability Alternative HA-Lizard

WHY HA AND WHAT IT DOES

XenServer (XS) contains a native high-availability (HA) option which allows quite a bit of flexibility in determining the state of a pool of hosts and under what circumstances Virtual Machines (VMs) are to be restarted on alternative hosts in the event of the loss of the ability of a host to be able to serve VMs. HA is a very useful feature that protects VMs from staying failed in the event of a server crash or other incident that makes VMs inaccessible. Allowing a XS pool to help itself maintain the functionality of VMs is an important feature and one that plays a large role in sustaining as much uptime as possible. Permitting the servers to automatically deal with fail-overs makes system administration easier and allows for more rapid reaction times to incidents, leading to increased up-time for servers and the applications they run.

XS allows for the designation of three different treatments of Virtual Machines: (1) always restart, (2) restart if possible, and (3) do not restart. The VMs designated with the highest restart priority will be the first to be attempted to restart and all will be handled, provided adequate resources (primarily, host memory) are available.  A specific start order, allowing for some VMs to be checked to be running before others, can also be established. VMs will be automatically distributed among whatever remaining XS hosts are considered active. Where necessary, note that hosts that contain expandable memory will be shrunk down to accommodate additional hosts and those hosts designated to be restarted will also be run with reduced memory, if necessary. If additional capacity exists to run more VMs, those designated as “start if possible” will be brought online. Whichever VMs that are not considered essential typically will be marked as “do not restart” and hence will be left “off” had they been running before, requiring any of those desired to be restarted to be done manually, resources permitting.

XS also allows for specifying the minimum number of active hosts to remain to accommodate failures; larger pools that are not overly populated with VMs can readily accommodate even two or more host failures.

The election of what hosts are “live” and should be considered active members of the pool follows a rather involved process of a combination of network accessibility plus access to an independent designated pooled Storage Repository (SR) that serves as an additional metric. The pooled SR can also be a fiber channel device, being independent of Ethernet connections. A quorum-based algorithm is applied to establish which servers are up and active as members of the pool and which -- in the event of a pool master failure -- should be elected the new pool master.

 

WHEN HA WORKS, IT WORKS GREAT

Without going into more detail, suffice it to say that this methodology works very well, however requiring a few prerequisite conditions that need to be taken into consideration. First of all, the mandate that a pooled storage device be available clearly means that a pool consisting of hosts that only make use of local storage will be precluded. Second, there is also a constraint that for a quorum to be possible, it is required to have a minimum of three hosts in the pool or HA results will be unpredictable as the election of a pool master can become ambiguous. This comes about because of the so-called “split brain” issue (http://linux-ha.org/wiki/Split_Brain) which is endemic in many different operating system environments that employ a quorum as means of making such a decision. Furthermore, while fencing (the process of isolating the host; see for example http://linux-ha.org/wiki/Fencing) is the typical recourse, the lack of intercommunication can result in a wrong decision being made and hence loss of access to VMs. Having experimented with two-host pools and the native XenServer HA, I would say that an estimate of it working about half the time is about right and from a statistical viewpoint, pretty much what you would expect.

This limitation is, however, still of immediate concern to those with either no pooled storage and/or only two hosts in a pool. With a little bit of extra network connectivity, a relatively simple and inexpensive solution to the external SR can be provided by making a very small NFS-based SR available. The second condition, however, is not readily rectified without the expense of at least one additional host and all the connectivity associated with it. In some cases, this may simply not be an affordable option.

 

ENTER HA-LIZARD

For a number of years now, an alternative method of providing HA has been available through the program package provided by HA-Lizard (http://www.halizard.com/) , a community project that provides a free alternative that is neither dependent on external SRs nor requires a minimum of three hosts within a pool. In this blog, the focus will be on the standard HA-Lizard version and because of the particularly harder-to-handle situation of a two-node pool, it will also be the subject of discussion.

I had been experimenting for some time with HA-Lizard and found in particular that I was able to create failure scenarios that needed some improvement. HA-Lizard’s Salvatore Costantino was more than willing to lend an ear to the cases I had found and this led further to a very productive collaboration on investigating and implementing means to deal with a number of specific cases involving two-host pools. The result of these several months of efforts is a new HA-Lizard release that manages to address a number of additional scenarios above and beyond its earlier capabilities.

It is worthwhile mentioning that there are two ways of deploying HA-Lizard:

1) Most use cases combine HA-Lizard and iSCSI-HA which creates a two-node pool using local storage while maintaining full VM agility with VMs being able to run on either host. In this case, DRBD (http://www.drbd.org/) is implemented in this type of deployment and it works very well making use of the real-time storage replication.

2) HA-Lizard, only, is used with an external Storage Repository (as in this particular case).

Before going into details of the investigation, a few words should go towards a brief explanation of how this works. Note that there is only Internet connectivity (the use of a heuristic network node) and no external SR, so how is a split brain situation then avoidable?

This is how I'd describe the course of action in this two-node situation:

If a node sees the gateway, assume it's alive. If it cannot, assume it's a good candidate for fencing. If the node that cannot see the gateway is the master, it should internally kill any running VMs and surrender its ability to be the master and fence itself. The slave node should promote itself to master and attempt to restart any missing VMs. Any that are on the previous master will probably fail though, because there is no communication to the old master. If the old VMs cannot be restarted, eventually the new master will be able to restart them regardless after a toolstack restart. If the slave node fails by not being able to communicate with the network, as long as the master still sees the network and not the slave’s network, it can assume the slave needs to fence itself, kill off its VMs and assume that they will be restarted on the current master. The slave needs to realize it cannot communicate out, and therefore should kill off any of its VMs and fence itself.

Naturally, the trickier part comes with the timing of the various actions, since each node has to blindly assume the other is going to conduct a sequence of events. The key here is that these are all agreed on ahead of time and as long as each follows its own specific instructions, it should not matter that each of the two nodes cannot see the other node. In essence, the lack of communication in this case allows for creating a very specific course of action! If both nodes fail, obviously the case is hopeless, but that would be true of any HA configuration in which no node is left standing.

Various test plans were worked out for various cases and the table below elucidates the different test scenarios, what was expected and what was actually observed. It is very encouraging that the vast majority of these cases can now be properly handled.

 

Particularly tricky here was the case of rebooting the master server from the shell, without first disabling HA-Lizard (something one could readily forget to do). Since the fail-over process takes a while, a large number of VMs cannot be handled before the communication breakdown takes place, hence one is left with a bit of a mess to clean up in the end. Nevertheless, it’s still good to know what happens if something takes place that rightfully shouldn’t!

The other cases, whether intentional or not, are handled predictably and reliably, which is of course the intent. Typically, a two-node pool isn’t going to have a lot of complex VM dependencies, so the lack of a start order of VMs should not be perceived as a big shortcoming. Support for this feature may even be added in a future release.

 

CONCLUSIONS

HA-Lizard is a viable alternative to the native Citrix HA configuration. It’s straightforward to set up and can handle standard failover cases with a selective “restart/do not restart” setting for each VM or can be globally configured. There are a quite a number of configuration parameters which the reader is encouraged to research in the extensive HA-Lizard documentation. There is also an on-line forum which serves as a source for information and prompt assistance with issues. This most recent release 2.1.3 is supported on both XenServer 6.5 and 7.0.

Above all, HA-Lizard shines when it comes to handling a non-pooled storage environment and in particular, all configurations of the dreaded two-node pool configuration. From my direct experience, HA-Lizard now handles the vast majority of issues involved in a two-node pool and can do so more reliably than the non-supported two-node pool using Citrix’ own HA application. It has been possible to conduct a lot of tests with various cases and importantly, and to do so multiple times to ensure the actions are predictable and repeatable.

I would encourage taking a look at HA-Lizard and giving it a good test run. The software is free (contributions are accepted) and it is in extensive use and has a proven track record.  For a two-host pool, I can frankly not think of a better alternative, especially with these latest improvements and enhancements.

I would also like to thank Salvatore Costantino for the opportunity to participate in this investigation and am very pleased to see the fruits of this collaboration. It has been one way of contributing to the Citrix XenServer user community that many can immediately benefit from.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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JK Benedict
I hath no idea why more have not read this intense article! As always: bravo, sir! BRAVO!
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 12:43
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PCI Pass-Through on XenServer 7.0

Plenty of people have asked me over the years how to pass-through generic PCI devices to virtual machines running on XenServer. Whilst it isn't officially supported by Citrix, it's none the less perfectly possible to do; just note that your mileage may vary, because clearly it's not rigorously tested with all the possible different types of device people might want to pass-through (from TV cards, to storage controllers, to USB hubs...!).

The process on XenServer 7.0 differs somewhat from previous releases, in that the Dom0 control domain is now CentOS 7.0-based, and UEFI boot (in addition to BIOS boot) is supported. Hence, I thought it would be worth writing up the latest instructions, for those who are feeling adventurous.

Of course, XenServer officially supports pass-through of GPUs to both Windows and Linux VMs, hence this territory isn't as uncharted as might first appear: pass-through in itself is fine. The wrinkles will be to do with a particular given piece of hardware.

A Short Introduction to PCI Pass-Through

Firstly, a little primer on what we're trying to do.

Your host will have a PCI bus, with multiple devices hosted on it, each with its own unique ID on the bus (more on that later; just remember this as "B:D.f"). In addition, each device has a globally unique vendor ID and device ID, which allows the operating system to look up what its human-readable name is in the PCI IDs database text file on the system. For example, vendor ID 10de corresponds to the NVIDIA Corporation, and device ID 11b4 corresponds to the Quadro K4200. Each device can then (optionally) have multiple sub-vendor and sub-device IDs, e.g. if an OEM has its own branded version of a supplier's component.

Normally, XenServer's control domain, Dom0, is given all PCI devices by the Xen hypervisor. Drivers in the Linux kernel running in Dom0 each bind to particular PCI device IDs, and thus make the hardware actually do something. XenServer then provides synthetic devices (emulated or para-virtualised) such as SCSI controllers and network cards to the virtual machines, passing the I/O through Dom0 and then out to the real hardware devices.

This is great, because it means the VMs never see the real hardware, and thus we can live migrate VMs around, or start them up on different physical machines, and the virtualised operating systems will be none the wiser.

If, however, we want to give a VM direct access to a piece of hardware, we need to do something different. The main reason one might want to is because the hardware in question isn't easy to virtualise, i.e. the hypervisor can't provide a synthetic device to a VM, and somehow then "share out" the real hardware between those synthetic devices. This is the case for everything from an SSL offload card to a GPU.

Aside: Virtual Functions

There are three ways of sharing out a PCI device between VMs. The first is what XenServer does for network cards and storage controllers, where a synthetic device is given to the VM, but then the I/O streams can effectively be mixed together on the real device (e.g. it doesn't matter that traffic from multiple VMs is streamed out of the same physical network card: that's what will end up happening at a physical switch anyway). That's fine if it's I/O you're dealing with.

The second is to use software to share out the device. Effectively you have some kind of "manager" of the hardware device that is responsible for sharing it between multiple virtual machines, as is done with NVIDIA GRID GPU virtualisation, where each VM still ends up with a real slice of GPU hardware, but controlled by a process in Dom0.

The third is to virtualise at the hardware device level, and have a PCI device expose multiple virtual functions (VFs). Each VF provides some subset of the functionality of the device, isolated from other VFs at the hardware level. Several VMs can then each be given their own VF (using exactly the same mechanism as passing through an entire PCI device). A couple of examples are certain Intel network cards, and AMD's MxGPU technology.

OK, So How Do I Pass-Through a Device?

Step 1

Firstly, we have to stop any driver in Dom0 claiming the device. In order to do that, we'll need to ascertain what the ID of the device we're interested in passing through is. We'll use B:D.f (Bus, Device, function) numbering to specify it.

Running lspci will tell you what's in your system:

davidcot@helical:~$ lspci
00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 82X38/X48 Express DRAM Controller
00:01.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82X38/X48 Express Host-Primary PCI Express Bridge
00:06.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82X38/X48 Express Host-Secondary PCI Express Bridge
00:1a.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) USB UHCI Controller #4 (rev 02)
00:1a.1 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) USB UHCI Controller #5 (rev 02)
00:1a.2 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) USB UHCI Controller #6 (rev 02)
00:1a.7 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) USB2 EHCI Controller #2 (rev 02)
00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) HD Audio Controller (rev 02)
00:1c.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) PCI Express Port 1 (rev 02)
00:1c.5 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) PCI Express Port 6 (rev 02)
00:1d.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) USB UHCI Controller #1 (rev 02)
00:1d.1 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) USB UHCI Controller #2 (rev 02)
00:1d.2 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) USB UHCI Controller #3 (rev 02)
00:1d.7 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) USB2 EHCI Controller #1 (rev 02)
00:1e.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801 PCI Bridge (rev 92)
00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82801IR (ICH9R) LPC Interface Controller (rev 02)
00:1f.2 SATA controller: Intel Corporation 82801IR/IO/IH (ICH9R/DO/DH) 6 port SATA Controller [AHCI mode] (rev 02)
00:1f.3 SMBus: Intel Corporation 82801I (ICH9 Family) SMBus Controller (rev 02)
01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation G86 [Quadro NVS 290] (rev a1)
04:00.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5754 Gigabit Ethernet PCI Express (rev 02)

Once you've found the device you're interested in, say 04:00.0 for my network card, we tell Dom0 to exclude it from being bound to by normal drivers. You can add to the Dom0 boot line as follows:

/opt/xensource/libexec/xen-cmdline --set-dom0 "xen-pciback.hide=(04:00.0)"

(What this does is edit /boot/grub/grub.cfg for you, or if you're booting using UEFI, /boot/efi/EFI/xenserver/grub.cfg instead!)

Step 2

Reboot! At the moment, a driver in Dom0 probably still has hold of your device, hence you need to reboot the host to get it relinquished.

Step 3

The easy bit: tell the toolstack to assign the PCI device to the VM. Run:

xe vm-list

And note the UUID of the VM you're interested in, then:

xe vm-param-set other-config:pci=0/0000:<B:D.f> uuid=<vm uuid>

Where, of course, <B.D.f> is the ID of the device you found in step 1 (like 04:00.0), and <vm uuid> corresponds to the VM you care about.

Step 4

Start your VM. At this point if you run lspci (or equivalent) within the VM, you should now see the device. However, that doesn't mean it will spring into life, because...

Step 5

Install a device driver for the piece of hardware you passed-through. The operating system within the VM may already ship with a suitable device driver, but it not, you'll need to go and get the appropriate one from the device manufacturer. This will normally be the standard Linux/Windows/other one that you would use for a physical system; the only difference occurs when you're using a virtual function, where the VF driver is likely to be a special one.

Health Warnings

As indicated above, pass-through has advantages and disadvantages. You'll get direct access to the hardware (and hence, for some functions, higher performance), but you'll forgo luxuries such as the ability to live migrate the virtual machine around (there's state now sitting on real hardware, versus virtual devices), and the ability to use high availability for that VM (because HA doesn't take into account how many free PCI devices of the right sort you have in your resource pool).

In addition, not all PCI devices take well to being passed through, and not all servers like doing so (e.g. if you're extending the PCI bus in a blade system to an expansion module, this can sometimes cause problems). Your mileage may therefore vary.

If you do get stuck, head over to the XenServer discussion forums and people will try to help out, but just note that Citrix doesn't officially support generic PCI pass-through, hence you're in the hands of the (very knowledgeable) community.

Conclusion

Hopefully this has helped clear up how pass-through is done on XenServer 7.0; do comment and let us know how you're using pass-through in your environment, so that we can learn what people want to do, and think about what to officially support on XenServer in the future!

Recent Comments
Tobias Kreidl
Yay, great to see this published in clear, concise steps! This is one for the XenServer forum to point to! ... Read More
Saturday, 05 November 2016 03:38
David Cottingham
If you want both the audio and GPU devices given to your VM, then yes, you need to use the procedure once for each device. Howeve... Read More
Monday, 07 November 2016 10:18
David Cottingham
Understood: it would be a performance gain for at least some use cases, as you're getting raw access to the NIC. The downside is t... Read More
Monday, 07 November 2016 10:06
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Enable XSM on XenServer 6.5 SP1

1 Introduction

Certain virtualization environments require the extra security provided by XSM and FLASK (https://wiki.xenproject.org/wiki/Xen_Security_Modules_:_XSM-FLASK). XenServer 7 benefits from its upgrade of the control domain to CentOS 7, which includes support for enabling XSM and FLASK. But what about legacy XenServer 6.5 installations that also require the added security? XSM and FLASK may be enabled on XenServer 6.5 as well, but it requires a bit more work.

Note that XSM is not currently a user-visible feature in XenServer, or a supported technology.

This article describes how to enable XSM and FLASK in XenServer 6.5 SP1. It makes the assumption that the reader is familiar with accessing, building, and deploying XenServer's Xen RPMs from source. While this article pertains to resources from SP1 source RPMs (XS65ESP1-src-pkgs.tar.bz2 included with SP1, http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX142355), a similar approach can be followed for other XenServer 6.5 hotfixes.

2 Patching Xen and xen.spec

XenServer issues some hypercalls not handled by Xen's XSM hooks. The following patch shows one possible way to handle these operations and commands, which is to always permit them.

diff --git a/xs6.5sp1/xen/xen-4.4.1/xen/xsm/flask/hooks.c b/xs6.5sp1/xen/xen-4.4.1/xen/xsm/flask/hooks.c
index 0cf7daf..a41fcc4 100644
--- a/xs6.5sp1/xen/xen-4.4.1/xen/xsm/flask/hooks.c
+++ b/xs6.5sp1/xen/xen-4.4.1/xen/xsm/flask/hooks.c
@@ -727,6 +727,12 @@ static int flask_domctl(struct domain *d, int cmd)
     case XEN_DOMCTL_cacheflush:
         return current_has_perm(d, SECCLASS_DOMAIN2, DOMAIN2__CACHEFLUSH);

+    case XEN_DOMCTL_get_runstate_info:
+        return 0;
+
+    case XEN_DOMCTL_setcorespersocket:
+        return 0;
+
     default:
         printk("flask_domctl: Unknown op %dn", cmd);
         return -EPERM;
@@ -782,6 +788,9 @@ static int flask_sysctl(int cmd)
     case XEN_SYSCTL_numainfo:
         return domain_has_xen(current->domain, XEN__PHYSINFO);

+    case XEN_SYSCTL_consoleringsize:
+        return 0;
+
     default:
         printk("flask_sysctl: Unknown op %dn", cmd);
         return -EPERM;
@@ -1299,6 +1308,9 @@ static int flask_platform_op(uint32_t op)
     case XENPF_get_cpuinfo:
         return domain_has_xen(current->domain, XEN__GETCPUINFO);

+    case XENPF_get_cpu_features:
+        return 0;
+
     default:
         printk("flask_platform_op: Unknown op %dn", op);
         return -EPERM;

The only other file that needs patching is Xen's RPM spec file, xen.spec. Modify HV_COMMON_OPTIONS as shown below.  Change this line:

% define HV_COMMON_OPTIONS max_phys_cpus=256

to:

% define HV_COMMON_OPTIONS max_phys_cpus=256 XSM_ENABLE=y FLASK_ENABLE=y

3 Compiling and Loading a Policy

To build a security policy, navigate to tools/flask/policy in Xen's source tree. Run make to compile the default security policy. It will have a name like xenpolicy.24, depending on your version of checkpolicy.

Copy xenpolicy.24 over to Dom0's /boot directory. Open /boot/extlinux.conf and modify the default section's append /boot/xen.gz ... line so it has --- /boot/xenpolicy.24 at the end. For example:

append /boot/xen.gz dom0_mem=752M,max:752M [.. snip ..] splash --- /boot/initrd-3.10-xen.img --- /boot/xenpolicy.24

After making this change, reboot.

While booting (or afterwards, via xl dmesg), you should see messages indicating XSM and FLASK initialized, read the security policy, and started in permissive mode. For example:

(XEN) XSM Framework v1.0.0 initialized
(XEN) Policy len  0x1320, start at ffff830117ffe000.
(XEN) Flask:  Initializing.
(XEN) AVC INITIALIZED
(XEN) Flask:  Starting in permissive mode.

4 Exercises for the Reader

  1. Create a more sophisticated implementation for handling XenServer hypercalls in xen/xsm/flask/hooks.c.
  2. Write (and load) a custom policy.
  3. Boot with flask_enforcing=1 set, and study any violations that occur (see xl dmesg output).
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anshul makkar
Good Work. Once the user builds the default policy, it should work for most of the scenario except for the specialized once like p... Read More
Friday, 28 October 2016 11:22
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Making a difference to the next release

With the 1st alpha build of the new, upcoming XenServer release (codenamed " Ely") as announced by Andy Melmed's blog on the 11th October – I thought it'd be useful to provide a little retrospective on how you, the xenserver.org community, have helped getting it off to a great start by providing great feedback on previous alphas, betas and releases - and how this has been used to strengthen the codebase for Ely as a whole based on your experiences.
 
As I am sure you are well aware - community users of xenserver.org can make use of the incident tracking database at bugs.xenserver.org to raise issues on recent alphas, betas and XenServer releases to raise issues or problems they've found on their hardware or configuration.  These incidents are raised in the form of XSO tickets which can then be commented upon by other members of the community and folks who work on the product.  
 
We listened
Looking back on all of the XSO tickets raised on the latest 7.0 release - these total more than 200 individual incident reports.  I want to take the time to thank everyone who contributed to these, often detailed, specific, constructive reports, and for working iteratively to understand more of the underlying issues.  Some of these investigations are ongoing, and need further feedback, but many of them are sufficiently clear to move forward to the next step.  
 
We understood
The incident reports were triaged and, by working with the user community, more than 80% of them have been processed.  Frequently this involved questions and answers to get a better handle on what was the underlying problem.  Then trying a change to the configuration or even a private fix to see and confirm if it related to the problem or resolved it.  The enthusiasm and skill of the reporters has been amazing, and continually useful.  At this point - we've separated the incidents into those which can be fixed as bugs, and those which are requests for features.  The latter have been provided to Citrix product management for consideration.  
 
We did
Out of these which can be fixed as bugs,  we raised or updated 45 acknowledged defects in XenServer.  More than 70% of these are already fixed - with another 20% being actively worked on.  The small remainder are blocked for some reason and awaiting a change elsewhere in the product, upstream or in our ability to test.  The 70% of fixes have now successfully either become part of some of the hotfixes which have been released for 7.0, or are in the codebase already and are being progressively released as part of the Ely alpha programme for the community to try.  
 
So what's next?  With work continuing apace on Ely - we have now opened the "Ely alpha" as a affects-version in the incident database to raise issues with this latest build.  At the same time - in the spirit of continuing to progressively improve the actively developing codebase - we have removed the 6.5 SP1 affects-version – so folks can focus on the new release.
 
Finally - on behalf of all xenserver.org users - my personal thanks to everyone who has helped improve both Dundee and Ely - both by reporting incidents, triaging and fixing them and by continuing to give your feedback on the latest new version.  This really makes a difference to all members of the community.
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Featured

XenServer Ely Alpha 1 Available

Hear ye, hear ye… we are pleased to announce that an alpha release of XenServer Project Ely is now available for download! After Dundee (7.0), we've come a little closer to Cambridge (the birthplace of Xen) for our codename, as the city of Ely is just up the road.

 
Since releasing version 7.0 in May, the XenServer engineering team has been working fervently to prepare the platform with the latest innovations in server virtualization technology. As a precursor, a pre-release containing the prerequisites for enabling a number of powerful (and really cool!) new features has been made available for download from the pre-release page.
 

What's In it?

 

The following is a brief description of some of the feature-prerequisites included in this pre-release:

 

Xen 4.7:  This release of Xen adds support for "live-patching" of the Xen hypervisor, allowing issues to be patched without requiring a host reboot. In this alpha release there is no functionality for you to test in this area, but we thought it was worth telling you about none the less. Xen 4.7 also includes various performance improvements, and updates to the virtual machine introspection code (surfaced in XenServer as Direct Inspect).

 

Kernel 4.4: Updated kernel to support future feature considerations. All device drivers will be at the upstream versions; we'll be updating these with drops direct from the hardware vendors as we go through the development cycle.

 

VM import/export performance: a longstanding request from our user community, we've worked to improve the import/export speeds of VMs, and Ely alpha 1 now averages 2x faster than the previous version.

 

What We'd Like Help With

 

The purpose of this alpha release is really to make sure that a variety of hardware works with project Ely. Because we've updated core platform components (Xen and the Dom0 kernel), it's always important to check on hardware that we don’t have in our QA labs that all is well. Thus, the more people who can download this build, install, and run a couple of VMs to check all is well the better.

 

Additionally, we've been working with the community (over on XSO-445) on improving VM import/export performance: we'd like to see whether the improvements we've seen in our tests are what you see too. If they're not, we can figure out why and fix it :-).

 

Upgrading

 

This is pre-release software, not for production use. Upgrades from XenServer 7.0 should work fine, but it goes without saying that you should ensure you back up any critical data.

 

Reporting Bugs

 

We encourage visitors to download the pre-release and provide us with your feedback. If you do find a problem, please head over to the bug tracker and file a ticket. Please be sure to include a server status report!

 

Now that we've moved up to a new pre-release project, it's time to remove the XS 6.5 SP1 fix version from the bug tracker, in order that we keep it tidy. You'll see an "Ely alpha" affects version is now present instead.

 

What Next?

 

Stay tuned for another pre-release build in the near future: as you may have heard, we've been keeping busy!

 
As always, we look forward to working with the XenServer community to make the next major release of XenServer the best version ever!

 

Cheers!

 

Andy M.

Senior Solutions Architect - XenServer PM

 

Recent Comments
David Reade
The download link for the release notes does not work. For "info.citrite.net" I'm getting "server not found". Is this a link to an... Read More
Tuesday, 11 October 2016 15:56
Tobias Kreidl
Always nice to see XenServer improvements and added features. The new kernel and live patching are nice. The vm-export/import gain... Read More
Wednesday, 12 October 2016 06:41
Willem Boterenbrood
Tobias, In my XenServer 7.0 test environment I see a large improvement of VM export speed compared to my 6.5SP1 live environment.... Read More
Friday, 14 October 2016 07:13
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About XenServer

XenServer is the leading open source virtualization platform, powered by the Xen Project hypervisor and the XAPI toolstack. It is used in the world's largest clouds and enterprises.
 
Commercial support for XenServer is available from Citrix.